filmmaking

Free ScreenPlay Template – Microsoft Word

Posted by | filmmaking | No Comments

So you want to write a screenplay, but you’re not sure you want to dish out $170 to $250 for Final Draft, or that you want to learn how to use free online screenplay writers like Celtx (It’s really not free if you want to use it properly). But you have this story you desperately want to tell that’s burning a hole in your head?

Fear not!

Download this Microsoft word template and watch the video below on how to use the template easily to format your screenplay.

Downloadhttps://gum.co/WrltA

Useful Links:

Screenplay Format: http://screenwriting.io/what-is-standard-screenplay-format/



Free Ink bleed, Ink Drop Resources

Posted by | After Effects, filmmaking | No Comments

Below are links to free ink bleed and ink matte resources for filmmakers.

1. Ink Mattes from The Creative Dojo:

Free Ink Matte Pack

I’d use these for water color effects.
2. Ink drops:
http://www.inkfootage.com/#free

There’s a Gumroad download link. All you have to do is type in ‘0’ (Zero) in the price, and it’ll allow you to download.

3. Ink Bleeds

Ink Stock Footage

You can download the footage individually. And they’re all free.

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If you know of other Free Ink Bleed and Ink Drop and Ink Matte resources, let me know and I’ll update this page.



Royalty Free Music – Free to use

Posted by | filmmaking, Uncategorized | No Comments

Some royalty free music I made. Feel free to use in your projects. Download information is below the videos. You can download for free at the links. The password is “filmmaker,” if you want to download for free. You can also pay the CAD$ 5, which is like US$2, if you like any of them. And if you can’t afford anything at all, just click on an ad or two, and we’ll be even. Cheers 🙂

1. Betrayal

Download Info:
https://gum.co/PkqM
Click on “I want this”
Value: $5
For Free download, under offer code type: filmmaker

2. Liberation

Download Info:
https://gum.co/ksoIs
Click on “I want this”
Value: CAD$5
For Free download, under offer code type: filmmaker

3. Badlands

Download Info:
https://gum.co/nulKa
Click on “I want this”
Value: CAD$5
For Free download, under offer code type: filmmaker

4. The Chase


Download Info:
https://gum.co/ompBw
Click on “I want this”
Value: CAD$5
For Free download, under offer code type: filmmaker

5. Car Stalk


Download Info:
https://gum.co/kyIw
Value: CAD$5
For Free download, under offer code type: filmmaker
 




 

6. Caution

Download Info:
https://gum.co/ePZUZ
Click on “I want this”
Value: CAD$5
For Free download, under offer code type: filmmaker

7. Fix It

Download Info:
https://gum.co/JmqkA
Click on “I want this”
Value: CAD$5
For Free download, under offer code type: filmmaker

8. Float

Download Info:
https://gum.co/foxg
Click on “I want this”
Value: CAD$5
For Free download, under offer code type: filmmaker

9. Open Sky

Download Info:
https://gum.co/BBoRI
Click on “I want this”
Value: CAD$5
For Free download, under offer code type: filmmaker

10. True Love


Download Info:
https://gum.co/uAUR
Click on “I want this”
Value: CAD$5
For Free download, under offer code type: filmmaker

11. Realization

Download Info:
https://gum.co/mzbg
Click on “I want this”
Value: CAD$5
For Free download, under offer code type: filmmaker
 





Indie Film Distribution – IndieFlix Review (preliminary)

Posted by | Distribution, filmmaking | No Comments

ifBanner

So what is IndieFlix? According to the Founder and CEO Scilla Andreen, Variety calls it the Netflix for Indie Films. The real question for Indie Filmmakers is “What can it do for me?”

After taking a pretty exhaustive look, I think it can do a lot more for the indie filmmaker, than thinking about Netflix can. Indiflix makes its money on a subscription model similar to Netflix. But the way you get paid is based on how many minutes of your film is actually watched.

As an indie filmmaker this may not feel like a solution. What exactly is the difference between putting your film up on youtube and no one watching, and putting it up on CreateSpace and nobody watching, and putting it up on IndieFlix and nobody watching? What is the difference between getting paid through a YouTube ad per view, and getting paid on IndieFlix, if the audience is watching neither?

I would say that the main difference between IndieFlix and say Youtube, in terms of whether you make money or not, is that IndieFlix is going to have less things on it YouTube. The very fact that YouTube has so much content makes it impossible for new entrants to get noticed in 2015. If you think of IndieFlix as YouTube but at a much smaller level, the chances of your film getting watched by an IndieFlix Subscriber is probably higher. But that’s just my thoughts on the subject. Here are some further pros and cons.





Pros:

  • If your film is half decent, I have a feeling that it will get picked (I haven’t submitted mine yet, but I have a feeling it will qualify. We shall see).
  • You will get paid on a per minute viewing algorithm, which means that you will get paid according to the how many minutes your film is viewed (basically, the more you advertise your film on IndieFlix, the better it is for IndieFlix and you).
  • There are a couple of stories about films that actually made quite a bit of money on Indieflix (I’ll write more on these later)
  • Indieflix has a non-exclusive arrangement with the filmmaker, which allows the filmmaker to do whatever else s/he wishes with the film
  • Unlike iTunes, or Distribber, or VimeoPro there is no fee to get your film into their library.
  • Your film can play on various platforms such as Roku and XBox

Cons:

  • They’re not going to market your film for you. They’re a technology platform like NetFlix for you to deliver your film. You still have to do your own marketing (This is not a real con, but it’s like any other platform)

 

The one thing that gives me some pause before I fully recommend it, although I could just think of one con, is the lack of endorsements by filmmakers for IndieFlix. If filmmakers are making money on IndieFlix, why aren’t there more stories of or by filmmakers of how much money they’re actually making on IndieFlix? I’ve googled far and wide for filmmaker experiences with IndieFlix, and have found crumbs here and there but nothing of real substance. That makes me wonder about the enthusiasm in CEO Andreen’s interviews I’ve heard and read. What’s the big secret? Why don’t they publicize their top money making films for the year, in their info for filmmakers?

The worst case scenario is that it doesn’t seem to be any worse than any other distribution platform, and is in fact better than some such as iTunes and Distribber, in the sense that it doesn’t cost anything to get it on the platform. And also the fact that your film won’t be lost amongst thousands of other films is also a plus.

But I will be including it in my distribution planning and will be updating this page. And if any of you know of any inside stories, please comment below for the benefit of others, or email me.

Mocha Tutorial for Beginners – Replace a Billboard

Posted by | filmmaking, Mocha, Tutorials | No Comments

Have you sat through Mocha tutorials, only to find that when you apply the techniques, it doesn’t work or track properly? Have you searched for “Mocha does not track” and “Mocha doesn’t work,” and “Mocha does not work with After Effects,” and wondered “what am I doing wrong?” Well then watch the video below. It will work as the very first tutorial every beginner should watch just to get an understanding of how to After Effects and mocha work together for beginners.

The experts know how to use Mocha. And I’m sure they know workarounds for issues. But what they don’t know is how to talk to us beginners. And this tutorial will show you at least one way of how to make Mocha work for you in After Effects.

Enjoy!!

 


 



What is the role of the Independent Film DP?

Posted by | filmmaking | No Comments

I worked with Nicholas Collister on a film that I recently wrapped shoot on, “The Girl Without A Song.” Nick was the DP on the shoot. He is unlike any other DP that I’ve worked with so far. He did a lot of the grunt work, that a DP with traditional film industry training or orthodoxies might have felt beneath him or her. Nick took up some of those tasks without even being asked to do so. Needless to say that it made my life as a Producer/Director much easier.

For instance, I had been mulling over how to accomplish the job of Data Wrangling, as we did not have a dedicated Wrangler on set, since budget was tight. Nick took care of the that every evening and made me copies too. My life was a lot easier simply because of his attitude towards filmmaking. I wanted to talk to him to figure out how he ticks. Nick eloquently describes his approach in the videos below. Maybe it will help other DPs trying to find the balance in their relationship with Directors.

I hope to work with Nick on an upcoming shoot.

Adobe Premiere Pro CC Media Pending Error Solved

Posted by | filmmaking, Random | 4 Comments

So you’re using Premiere Pro CC. And all of a sudden your viewer freezes on a frame. You can hear the audio when you hit play, but but the video is frozen. And if by chance it unfreezes, it says “Media Pending.” And to make things worse, Premiere Pro CC doesn’t even load after you shut it down, without a restart of your machine.

Media_Pending

You’ve searched the Internet far and wide. Everyone tells you to reconnect this way or that, and nothing works. You are now getting irritated by the fact that I’m rambling on without giving you the solution. All I can tell you is that I found a solution for myself. And it’s two of the the simplest things:

Solution 1:

Don’t use Magic Bullet Looks. Just get rid of it from the effects panels of the video files where you put them. And all will be fine.

Solution 2:
Another solution that seems to work is to add cuts in your clip. If the clip is long, just add cut points on it in the timeline and it will stop the media pending sign. It’s a ridiculous solution, but it works. It seems to be an indexing problem and a large clip just never seems to get indexed, either because of size or plugins added.

Leave a comment if the suggestions work!



Shooting with Two / Multiple Cameras – Lens / Camera choices

Posted by | filmmaking | No Comments

If you’ve decided that you’ll shoot with two cameras, here are the three things to worry about.

Make sure audio is being recorded separately and slating is done for both cameras for syncing in post.

If possible, try to make sure that you’re using the same camera. In the world of DSLR filmmaking, the sensors of the different cameras can be significantly different on how they capture light. This will produce different color schemes and graininess for the same lighting conditions. If you don’t have a choice, this is not the end of the world, as color correction in post is always available. But if you haven’t engaged in that kind of post production, it might be a good idea to find someone with the same camera as yours for your multi-cam shoot.

Lenses are the other issue. If you’re shooting opposite sides of a conversation for instance, it would be ideal if both sides looked similar, and that can be achieved with lenses that are similar, with cameras that are equidistant from the subjects on either side. Anything else might look a bit off. And one of the goals for us filmmakers at least at this beginning stage should be to make sure that our cinematography is not distracting to the point where the audience is thinking about it. The audience should only be thinking about the story, not about why one actor appears closer to the camera than the other.

So, ideally try to make sure the second camera is the same as the first, and you have a similar set of lenses for each camera. It’s easy to say this I know, but beg and borrow to make sure such is the case for your shoot. Otherwise you’ll be spending a lot more time in post production than you’d care to.

Audio for Filmmakers – How To Think About Audio

Posted by | Audio, filmmaking | No Comments

The problem most independent filmmakers have with audio, is that most of us lack experience. The other problem we have is that when we think about making our movie, we think about the visual aspects of filmmaking, how w’re going to light a scene or subject or how we’re going to frame a shot. Rarely do we consider, in our thinking, if say we’re going to shoot a scene at a coffee shop, whether the fridge noise is going to be an impediment on the day of the shoot. But these are the un-sexy things that we need to take into consideration when planning our shoot day. If we shoot near a train station, how will the noise affect our shoot? If we’re shooting outside, will the neighbors be mowing their lawns? How will the traffic noise affect a shoot by the side of a road?

The other thing to understand is this simple truth: If no one notices the audio, you’ve done your job properly. If the audio is bad, the audience will notice, and all the energy spent on perfecting the visual aspects of your film will be for naught.

So let’s think about that a bit more. If the visuals aren’t perfect, you can play with the color correction, maybe cut to a separate shot even. But if the audio is bad, all is lost. There can be no compromise on audio. It can’t even be a little bad. The audience is so accustomed to good audio that any deviation from quality will be noticed, and that is the death knell for your movie.

So, whatever it is about the visuals that excites you and motivates you to make your movie, the end is unattainable without the requisite time spent on perfecting the audio; not making the audio good, or better, but perfecting it. There are no two ways about it. Until we filmmakers get this through our heads, we’re only good for youtube, not for broadcast or for theater.